CEM

The Coastline Evolution Model (CEM) addresses predominately sandy, wave-dominated coastlines on time-scales ranging from years to millenia and on spatial scales ranging from kilometers to hundreds of kilometers. Shoreline evolution results from gradients in wave-driven alongshore sediment transport. At its most basic level, the model follows the standard 'one-line' modeling approach, where the cross-shore dimension is collapsed into a single data point. However, the model allows the plan-view shoreline to take on arbitrary local orientations, and even fold back upon itself, as complex shapes such as capes and spits form under some wave climates (distributions of wave influences from different approach angles). The model can also represent the geology underlying the sandy coastline and shoreface in a simplified manner and enables the simulation of coastline evolution when sediment supply from an eroding shoreface may be constrained. CEM also supports the simulation of human manipulations to coastline evolution through beach nourishment or hard structures.

coastal evolution

Alias

Coastline evolution model

true

Contributor(s)

Initial contribute: 2021-09-08

Authorship

:  
Duke University
:  
abmurray@duke.edu
Is authorship not correct? Feed back

Classification(s)

Application-focused categoriesNatural-perspectiveLand regions

Detailed Description

English {{currentDetailLanguage}} English

We first briefly discuss the model we use for this evaluation, 2004; Ashton et al., 2001]. When waves break at a shoreline, they drive a flux of sediment along the shore. The magnitude of this flux is related to the breaking-wave height, and to the wave approach angle, relative to the shoreline orientation. Alongshore sediment fluxes, Qs, are based on the commonly used CERC equation [Komar and Inman, 1970; Komar, 1998]:

 

Where Hb and \( ∅ \)b are breaking-wave height and crest angle, respectively, and \( θ \) is local shoreline orientation. K1 is an empirical constant equal to 0.4 m1/2/s for the sandy coastline considered here. 

Quoted from : Coastline responses to changing storm patterns

{{htmlJSON.HowtoCite}}

{{htmlJSON.Copy}}

Contributor(s)

Initial contribute : 2021-09-08

{{htmlJSON.CoContributor}}

Authorship

:  
Duke University
:  
abmurray@duke.edu
Is authorship not correct? Feed back

History

Last modifier
Yihan Zhang
Last modify time
2021-09-08
Modify times
View History

QR Code

×

{{curRelation.overview}}
{{curRelation.author.join('; ')}}
{{curRelation.journal}}









{{htmlJSON.RelatedItems}}

{{htmlJSON.LinkResourceFromRepositoryOrCreate}}{{htmlJSON.create}}.

Drop the file here, orclick to upload.
Select From My Space
+ add

{{htmlJSON.authorshipSubmitted}}

Cancel Submit
{{htmlJSON.Cancel}} {{htmlJSON.Submit}}
{{htmlJSON.Localizations}} + {{htmlJSON.Add}}
{{ item.label }} {{ item.value }}
{{htmlJSON.ModelName}}:
{{htmlJSON.Cancel}} {{htmlJSON.Submit}}
Name:
Version:
Model Type:
Model Domain:
Scale:
Purpose:
Principles:
Incorporated models:

Model part of

larger framework

Process:
Information:
Initialization:
Hardware Requirements:
Software Requirements:
Inputs:
Outputs:
{{htmlJSON.Cancel}} {{htmlJSON.Submit}}
Title Author Date Journal Volume(Issue) Pages Links Doi Operation
{{htmlJSON.Cancel}} {{htmlJSON.Submit}}
{{htmlJSON.Add}} {{htmlJSON.Cancel}}

{{articleUploading.title}}

Authors:  {{articleUploading.authors[0]}}, {{articleUploading.authors[1]}}, {{articleUploading.authors[2]}}, et al.

Journal:   {{articleUploading.journal}}

Date:   {{articleUploading.date}}

Page range:   {{articleUploading.pageRange}}

Link:   {{articleUploading.link}}

DOI:   {{articleUploading.doi}}

Yes, this is it Cancel

The article {{articleUploading.title}} has been uploaded yet.

OK
{{htmlJSON.Cancel}} {{htmlJSON.Confirm}}