Bedrock Fault Scarp

This is a two-dimensional numerical model that computes the topographic evolution of the facet slope in the footwall of an active normal fault.

faulterosionhillslopefacetspurscarp

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Contributor(s)

Initial contribute: 2021-09-11

Authorship

:  
University of Colorado
:  
Gregory.Tucker@colorado.edu
:  
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Classification(s)

Application-focused categoriesNatural-perspectiveLand regions
Method-focused categoriesProcess-perspectivePhysical process calculation

Detailed Description

English {{currentDetailLanguage}} English

Quote from: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRF..116.1022T/abstract

  The existence of well-preserved Holocene bedrock fault scarps along active normal faults in the Mediterranean region and elsewhere suggests a dramatic reduction in rates of rock weathering and erosion that correlates with the transition from glacial to interglacial climate. We test and quantify this interpretation using a case study in the Italian Central Apennines. Holocene rates are derived from measurements of weathering-pit depth along the Magnola scarp, where previous cosmogenic 36Cl analyses constrain exposure history. To estimate the average hillslope erosion rate over ∼105 years, we introduce a simple geometric model of normal-fault footwall slope evolution. The model predicts that the gradient of a weathering-limited footwall hillslope is set by fault dip angle and the ratio of slip rate to erosion rate; if either slip or erosion rate is known, the other can be derived. Applying this model to the Magnola fault yields an estimated average weathering rate on the order of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr, more than 10 times higher than either the Holocene scarp weathering rate or modern regional limestone weathering rates. A numerical model of footwall growth and erosion, in which erosion rate tracks the oxygen-isotope curve, reproduces the main features of hillslope and scarp morphology and suggests that the hillslope erosion rate has varied by about a factor of 30 over the past one to two glacial cycles. We conclude that preservation of carbonate fault scarps reflects strong climatic control on rock breakdown by frost cracking.

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Greg Tucker (2021). Bedrock Fault Scarp, Model Item, OpenGMS, https://geomodeling.njnu.edu.cn/modelItem/91d31e3c-3f80-442a-92b6-1036d9e90d6c
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Contributor(s)

Initial contribute : 2021-09-11

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Authorship

:  
University of Colorado
:  
Gregory.Tucker@colorado.edu
:  
View
Is authorship not correct? Feed back

History

Last modifier
HaoCheng Wang
Last modify time
2021-09-17
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