MERS-CoV spillover at the camel-human interface

Typed maximum clade credibility tree of MERS-CoV genomes from humans and camels.

MERS-CoVcamel-human interface
  1068

Contributor

contributed at 2020-05-01

Authorship

Affiliation:  
Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
Email:  
gdudas@fredhutch.org
Affiliation:  
Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Affiliation:  
Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States
Affiliation:  
Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
Is authorship not correct? Feed back

Classification(s)

Earth System SubjectEarth Surface SystemAnthroposphere

Detailed Description

Maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree showing inferred ancestral hosts for MERS-CoV recovered with the structured coalescent. Vast majority of MERS-CoV evolution is inferred to occur in camels (orange) with human outbreaks (blue) representing evolutionary dead-ends for the virus. Confidence in host assignment is depicted as a colour gradient, with increased uncertainty in host assignment (posterior probabilities close to 0.5) shown as grey. Some of the branches leading up to zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV into humans are too long to have spent much of their time in humans, given our a priori belief that MERS-CoV cannot circulate in humans for long periods of time. Thus branches encompassing cross-species transmissions are depicted as being in camels right up to the common ancestor or tip of each human outbreak. Whilst large clusters of human cases are apparent in the tree, significant contributions to human outbreaks are made by singleton sequences, likely representing recent cross-species transmissions that were caught early.

 

link:https://elifesciences.org/articles/31257

How to cite

Gytis Duda, Luiz Max Carvalho, Andrew Rambaut, Trevor Bedford (2020). MERS-CoV spillover at the camel-human interface, Model Item, OpenGMS, https://geomodeling.njnu.edu.cn/modelItem/89567e15-fb9d-4aae-9ba2-70d1dc8701f8
Copy

History

Last modifier : 
Jeremy
Last modify time : 
2020-05-04
Modify times : 
View History

QR Code

Contributor

contributed at 2020-05-01

Authorship

Affiliation:  
Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
Email:  
gdudas@fredhutch.org
Affiliation:  
Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Affiliation:  
Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States
Affiliation:  
Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
Is authorship not correct? Feed back

History

Last modifier : 
Jeremy
Last modify time : 
2020-05-04
Modify times : 
View History

QR Code

You can link related {{typeName}} from your personal space to this model item, or you can create a new {{typeName.toLowerCase()}}.

Model Content & Service

These authorship information will be submitted to the contributor to review.